DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
You must be logged in to rate this
The One Ring - Laughter of Dragons
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/28/2020 17:18:07

The One Ring. It's an RPG that really captures the feeling of Tolkein's Middle Earth. Since that's what got a lot of players my age into RPGs (including me), I'm glad there's a game set in Middle Earth.

The Laughter of Dragons is everything you need to set your players up against a series of adventures as enjoyable as The Hobbit and culminating in a foe as epic as Smaug.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Laughter of Dragons
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
by David W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/25/2020 12:25:52

Cubicle 7 are on fire at the moment ! Great game with a accessible system that allows for a variable depth of complexity and a setting which allows for a breadth of play style depending on your tastes - if you want to lose yourself in some true fantasy roleplay then give this fun game a run for its money - you wont be disappointed.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

WFRP: Death on the Reik - Enemy Within Campaign Director's Cut Volume 2
by Andrew D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/13/2020 10:28:09

So, it’s finally here, part two (or three, depending upon how the counting is done) of The Enemy Within Campaign.

The adventure sees the heroes of Enemy in Shadows fleeing, perhaps extremely rapidly, from Bogenhafen with at best a couple of minor leads pointing towards dark insidious conspiracies beneath the Empire’s ‘civilised’ surface. What follows is a long, almost self-contained, adventure across the great waterways of The Reik and its tributaries.

Death on the Reik follows a very similar structure to Enemy in Shadows breaking down to a foreword, synopsis, eight chapters incorporating the adventure, a single appendix and a handout and map section (no longer with spoiler annotations).

The eighth chapter is the first part of the scenario Carrion up the Reik by James Wallis, originally published in the Hogshead reprint of Power Behind the Throne as an interquel that bridges the river bound part of the campaign to the city of Middenheim.

The adventure chapters, in contrast to the original, are broken down by the sections of riverways that are traversed, which is a welcome change as the original could be somewhat confusing. Some of these are possibly only a single session play, but several would likely span many. Additionally, due to the very open world nature of this part of the campaign, any number of other scenarios may easily be interjected.

DotR is a vast and sprawling adventure with mysteries to solve and even a couple of traditional[ish] dungeon crawls to boot.

Plot Spoilers Death on the Reik is the story of a noble family driven mad following the acquisition of a warpstone meteorite from Morrsleib itself several generations ago. The party get wind of this discovery while investigating another cult faction, The Red Crown, linked to the events in Bogenhafen.

Much of the first five chapters is a race between the players and The Red Crown to recover the meterorite, incorporating a couple of substantial scenarios/sub-plots. Over the course of these chapters it is necessary for the GM to track the progress of the players and the Red Crown, before any potential confrontation between the two parties takes place.

The plot begins (well, probably) by uncovering the research of a wizard tracking the warpstone meteorite at a disused observatory (now being rebuilt as a signal tower). Pursuing these clues, along with those from Enemy in Shadows, eventually sees the characters at the town of Wittgendorf, a miserable location of mutants and beggars. With the help of local outlaws, the characters infiltrate castle Wittgendorf and deal with the corrupted noble at the heart of the town’s troubles.

Along the way, there are a couple of minor urban encounters involving the Purple Hand, continuing the case of Mistaken Identity, a kidnapping to solve and opportunities for advancements and career changes. A rural hike leads to the impact crater of the warpstone meteorite and a large subplot with dwarfs, goblins with some typical WFRP subversion.

The final chapter sees the characters lose their barge and become coerced into acting as a courier transporting merchandise to Middenheim.

As the fourth edition version of TEW is less bound to the pre-generated characters than the original, it does struggle with finding motivation for the characters to go to certain locations. For example, Harbul would be striking up a relationship with Elvyra from Enemy in Shadows to continue his training but without him (or a near equivalent) this link to the earlier parts of Death on the Reik is a lot weaker.

Another example is Wanda, the apprentice wizard from the original, who would be visiting her mentor, Heironymous Blitzen, which was integral in the 1st edition version.

DotR attempts to address this within the appendix by adding a series of mentors that could be used at the GM’s discretion. Although this is a fine, perhaps a framework for adding mentors to the plot would have been useful. This is possibly something that could be addressed in more detail in the companion.

Another minor complaint is that the synopsis could be a little more substantial. I’m still lacking a feel for how the campaign ends post Power Behind the Throne. This is exacerbated by the inclusion of Carrion up the Reik, which was originally planned by James Wallis to link to the unpublished Hogshead rewrite of Empire in Flames. Hopefully those threads will come to something in the Director’s Cut.

As noted in the comments section, River Life of the Empire, an integral part of the original version, is not present in this book. Instead, it will be included in the Companion. This decision was made to make way for Carrion up the Reik. River Life of the Empire contained (and presumably still will) useful information for trading, navigation and piloting and the social and economic nature of the towns and villages on the nation’s riverways. This will be invaluable for those wanting to really add meat to the adventurer’s time on the rivers. It’s also a reason for the events in Carrion up the Reik, as James Wallis noted, the characters may end up “a bunch of demented early renaissance Elite players,” and completely ignore the plot.

This is frustrating as this information is very useful but given the page count limitations the only option would be to remove the handouts and maps to a separate booklet similar to the Collector’s Edition. I suppose the positive spin is that this demonstrates how much useful content there is overall.

We’ve seen the return of the Grognard boxes and once again they contain interesting alternatives to mix things up for the players. There are perhaps not as many, again likely due to space limitations. Interestingly, they’re used most frequently at the end of the campaign to handle veteran players attempting to subvert the plot (some of them even suggest letting them do this).

The artwork is of a very similar standard to Enemy in Shadows, but I think some of the riverway vistas are level above, particularly the evocative rendering of Castle Wittgendorf. Maps are of a more consistently high standard, but perhaps one or two could benefit from being larger (Trail of the Red Crown in particular).

Overall, Death on the Reik is excellent. It was my second favourite WFRP adventure following Power Behind the Throne and contains dozens of hours of play at least and a whole lot more when the supplemental content comes out with the Companion. Unlike other parts of the campaign, it’s perhaps got a little bit for everyone: mysteries, hack’n’slash, investigations, dungeon crawls, rural and urban sequences and a lot of messing about on the river. The latter sections also include a very large dose of WFRP nihilism, particularly Castle Wittgendorf. I guess that’s all part of the fun.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
WFRP: Death on the Reik - Enemy Within Campaign Director's Cut Volume 2
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Enemy Within Campaign - Volume 1: Enemy in Shadows
by Patrick M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/08/2020 02:27:26

The Enemy in Shadows indeed is a faithful and improved remake of the original first modules of the Enemy Within campaign. The thing is that the source material just didn't age that well.

At the time of the original release, this campaign was groundbreaking. It was first to move away from "kill 'em and take their stuff" adventures, focussing instead on memorable NPCs, involved plots and putting investigation ahead of fighting to solve problems. So at the time of it's original release this would have gotten a 5-start review from me.

BUT: Looking at the adventure (new and old versions alike) from today's perspective, one can only note that this is a tight railroad. This doesn't have to be bad, as railroading sometimes is needed to tell a comprehensive story. But this railroad has some very bad "derailment points", of which I just mention a few below:

SPOILERS AHEAD

a) The whole plot hinges on on PC being a look-alike of a deceased (evil) NPC. But what happens if this PC dies? This is a real risk in a game as prone to random death as Warhammer. So you either give this one PC strong Plot-Armor or you can scrap significant parts of this adventure (and the next modules as well) if the PC passes away

b) Some logic PC action is completely ruled out and disregarded: The secret temple in the sewers will be cleaned out, no matter what the players do (i.e. put one PC on permanent guard there); the secret door can't be found no matter what; the cult traitor can't be protected no matter what; the players will be framed for murder no matter what ...

c) The investigation in Bögenhaven doesn't advance by smart thinking of the players. It is a thin trail of breadcrumps of NPC accidently dropping secret letters and notes out of their pockets. Nicely signed with a heptagram and a the skull of some beast

d) The final reveal comes with one big cultist getting cold feed and spilling the beans to the PC. But this only works if the PCs have contacted/questioned him before. But there is very little reason for the PCs to do that. So the whole plot breaks down if the PCs don't contact this one person out of the blue.

e) The opening adventure of the the next module Death on the Reik assumes that the PCs "befriended" a healer/herbalist in Enemy in Shadows. But there is no hook why they should befriend her. She is one of many tradespeople selling their products at the Schattenfest fair ground. PCs MIGHT talk to her, if they need healing herbs, but they for sure will not befriend her.

For above reasons I would give the source material a 1/5 stars from today's point of view. The good production quality of the new version raises it to 2/5 stars. Shame that they didn't decide to fix the weak points of the original though.

(Note: I GMed both the original verision some 30 years ago as well as the current version just last month. We decided to not continue the campaign for above mentioned reasons)



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Fourth Edition Enemy Within Campaign - Volume 1: Enemy in Shadows
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

WFRP: Death on the Reik - Enemy Within Campaign Director's Cut Volume 2
by Robert C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/04/2020 01:12:23

The content isn't bad at all. I'm rating it at two stars because its missing advertised content and when this was pointed out, instead of addressing it, they changed the description. See the discussions on this product.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
WFRP: Death on the Reik - Enemy Within Campaign Director's Cut Volume 2
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

De Profundis Second Edition
by Rusty B. Date Added: 06/28/2020 16:58:57

Over the last 40 years, I've bought a lot of RPGs & supplements; none has triggered near instant regret the way this one has.

I like exchanging letters with friends, and I like writing up my group's Call of Cthulhu sessions; it sounds like this game ought to be my kind of thing! However, I can't tell, because I can't handle the rulebook.

Bottom of page 10: "It's also time for you to learn what De Profundis is all about." OK! Great! I was hoping to find that on page 1 or 2, but good, let's go!

Page 14: "But for now it's more important to explain the game's concept, as well as its details and my own thoughts about it, as precisely as possible." OK! That's what I've been waiting for!

Page 15: "Ah! The play report from your last session of Call of Cthulhu was excellent. You got me all but carried off to Damian's room and sitting there with you, then off with the group into the depths of the ocean in that small bathysphere. Top quality CoC !" None of that means anything to me, and after pages & pages of this, I'm now too frustrated to care whether there's a game hidden in here. Dude, I'm out.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
De Profundis Second Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: The Graveyard Shift
by Philip C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/25/2020 12:21:21

In the grim darkness of the Warhammer 40K universe even a simple walk through a graveyard is complicated, especially when the graveyard takes up the entire moon and making food and tools out of the bodies is normal. Short simple adventure which can launch others adventures. Only downside is as played players do not get a choice about going on the mission but that is way to easy to fix.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: The Graveyard Shift
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

WFRP Ubersreik Adventures
by Ross Y. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/24/2020 19:56:04

I like this book conceptually, unfortunately execution is less to be desired.

Compared to the original adventures, this compilation features much lower-resolution artwork than the individual adventures. This includes everything from Maps, to Character Portraits and even the Front Cover and Page borders. Additionally there are no bookmarks and several of the adventures have DM maps included but not the player maps.

If you buy the BUNDLE instead, you get all the adventures, better quality artwork and unmarked player versions of all the maps. Each adventure was updated with a page or two of extra content to connect them in the main book. However each of the individual PDFs was updated as well.

The adventures themselves are excellent and I reccomend them all. At the moment however I wouldn't reccomend this version, I would buy the bundle version instead. I spoke to C7 On Twitter and they opened up form for feedback and errata (see the discussions) however at this time the PDF has not been udpated.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
WFRP Ubersreik Adventures
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
by Marc C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/16/2020 12:10:16

Very good, the system is incredibly effective. The book lacks in the "what is it to be in a binding and how did we get here" department but overall I strongly recommend this release.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound: Crash & Burn
by Marc C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/16/2020 12:08:31

A bit too simplistic and combat focused. Introducing another faction in the deep likely makes that adventure more interesting.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound: Crash & Burn
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
by Marcus M. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/06/2020 23:42:28

For 10,000 years, endless war has engulfed the galaxy. From the decimated ruin of Cadia to the war-ravaged battlefields of Armageddon, and from the Hive cities of Necromunda to the Aeldari craftworld Iyanden, a billion billion souls have been lost to the eternal conflict.

In Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Wrath & Glory from Cubicle 7, you will be taking on the role of one of the pitiful souls who inhabit this universe, one where the fascist cultic dictatorship of the Imperium comes into conflict with servants of the dark gods, mindless war-hungry orks, mindless Necron automatons, or a littany of other alien races just as horrible. 40k is a world where there are no good sides. Everyone is despicable in their own special and unique way.

The previous version of 40k roleplay by Fantasy Flight was broken down into multiple books depending on what flavor of 40k you were interested in, separating Imperial Guard from Space Marines from Inquisition, and only allowing you to play as either a member of the Imperium or, in the case of Black Crusade, the forces of Chaos fighting the Imperium. In Wrath & Glory, the rules cover all of those, as well as playing as the Aeldari and Orks.

Let’s take a look at the rules.

Every campaign begins with a framework. This is essentially a group template, where the table decides what they want to play as in the universe. Do you want to all be Imperial Inquisitors? Hive gangers? A squad of Aeldari rangers lost on a planet at the edge of the galaxy? It’s important to set up the group’s framework, so you don’t end up in a game with a Space Marine, an Aeldari Howling Banshee, and an Ork Loota with no explanation as to why they’re all in the same party. In addition, because your stats are determined by spending XP, you’ll choose whether the characters will be Tier 1 through 4, which will give you different amounts of XP to spend at character creation. If you really wanna play as a Space Marine, you can do so, but you’re unlikely to be playing alongside an Inquisitorial Acolyte or Ministorum Priest. Here, more than in most RPGs, setting the expectation for the campaign is very important.

Whereas the FFG rules utilized a percentile system assembled from the WHFRP and Inquisitor rulesets, the ruleset here is the same as C7’s Age of Sigmar Roleplay: Soulbound. You roll a pool of D6’s, trying to get a certain number of successes above the target number, with the difficulty of scoring each success determined by the complexity of the test.

Here, you have three stats that will fluctuate throughout the session. Wrath, Glory and Ruin.

When rolling your D6’s, one die should be a different size or color representing your Wrath. A 1 or 6 on the die can activate specific effects. When you roll a 6, add 1 Glory to the group’s total. In addition, a successful check that also contains a 6 on the Wrath die is a critical success. When you roll a 1 on the Wrath die, you now have a Complication. This is a modifier to the final result, making it a “yes, but,” or a “no, and,” depending on whether the overall check succeeded or failed.

Wrath Points represent your character’s inner rage, fire and wrath. You can spend these points to reroll dice, claim narrative control, and restore shock.

You’ll note that there… well, there doesn’t seem to be any relation between Wrath Points and Wrath Dice. I’m not sure why a different term wasn’t used, as it could be pretty confusing for players during the course of a game. I asked Cubicle 7, and they said it’s a holdover from the original system.

Glory is a group resource. Your party always begins with 0 Glory at the end of the session, and represents the group’s determination and grit. These points are spent to add dice to a pool, make criticals more severe, and increase damage. Glory is gained from rolling a 6 on your Wrath die, as mentioned above, or you can shift a die from your pool. This means that when you roll any other 6’s, you can choose to remove that die from the dice pool (presumably seeing you succeeded without that die) to gain Glory. You can also shift in order to gain info, speed up the process you’re rolling for, or improve the quality of the test.

Ruin is a resource that the GM gets to use against the players. Whenever the players fail a fear or corruption test, or the GM rolls a 6 on their Wrath, Ruin rises. The GM can use it to reroll failures, or activate special Ruin actions that powerful enemies possess.

Psychic powers work how they do in most 40k games, in that failure causes horrible Perils of the Warp, strange happenings that make things very interesting. An optional rule exists that lower-level NPC Psykers and any bystanders fail any checks from Perils of the Warp, meaning horrific things happen around Psykers, making them always strange, wierd and dangerous.

The star system detailed in W&G continues the traditions of Calixis Sector (detailed in Dark Heresy), Scarus Sector (detailed in Eisenhorn), and Caligari Sector (detailed in Inquisitor – Martyr). It’s a new region given great detail. In this case, it’s a VERY busy solar system with multiple worlds of various types. With the terrible perils found in warp travel, you likely won’t want to leave the system, so it’s nice to see that you could easily run multiple campaigns here. There are Space Hulks, two bizzare worlds known as the Membrane Worlds, Hive Worlds, and Shrine Worlds. There’s a lot to see, and a lot to invent on your own.

This game is fantastic. It’s a really dynamic system that’s definitely set up to make the players feel like the anti-heroes everyone in 40k is, while still keeping the pressure on them and making them feel like they’re always one step away from destruction. If you’re a 40k player, I definitely recommend it, and if you aren’t, embrace the dark far future. It’s a terrible place, but it’s OUR terrible place.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wrath & Glory: Core Rules
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
by Johannes H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/04/2020 08:05:31

Easy and fun rules with good mechanisms. Love that the combat uses zones. Factions/archetypes that lore-wise have special equipment and mechanics are well represented (kharadron overlords got some cool things that is just for them, as an example). Well organized pdf/book. Great community on discord. My only wish is that the character sheet would mark what attribute each skill uses, or be put in a layout of skills being sub-sections under each attribute-section. And maybe it's just me but I would like to see more social encouter skills like "charm" and "leadership" for those situations where you want to get a dialog started with good and honest intentions with a NPC that is not interested or hard to earn trust from. "Guile" and "entertain" does not always fit those scenarios.. At least when you've been taught by so many other rpg-systems that "guile" is for deceiving, lying, and convincing in a cunning manner.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
by Marcus M. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/03/2020 23:36:36

The Mortal Realms are in terrible peril. The only thing standing between the fall of the Cities of Sigmar and the beginning of a new Age of Chaos is you, an elf pirate, a dwarf rune smith with a massive mowhawk, and a blind elf riding a gigantic flying fish.

In AOSRP: Soulbound, you are one of the Soulbound, a member of an ancient order who sacrifice their own souls and immortality to guard the Mortal Realms.

The game is set in the world of Age of Sigmar, a wargame by Games Workshop, while this RPG is published by Cubicle 7, who created the 40k RPG, Wrath and Glory, as well as The One Ring.

When I first started playing Age of Sigmar, I didn’t know too much about the lore of the setting. I knew that the Warhammer Old World had been destroyed and that Sigmar rebuilt everything into Eight Realms, each aligned with one of the Old World winds of magic. I ended up diving into the lore, however, and love it.

Soulbound presents and explains the universe. These eight realms are each drastically unique, having no defined border, but connected through realmgates. They’re like extreme versions of the planes of D&D.

The setting is a lot more dynamic and unique than the generic fantasy world of the Old World, which cut and pasted elements of real-world history onto a map that vaguely resembled our own.

The shakeup of the Old World also changed the races of the world. There’s a lot of speculation that the purpose was so that Games Workshop had a much narrower and specific IP. As a result, Dwarves are now Druardin, divided into Fireslayers (drawn from the Slayers of old) and Kharadron Overlords, which are like steampunk dwarves in heavy armor and flying ships. Elves are now Aelves, split between the Idoneth Deepkin who are blind undersea elves, Black Corsairs who are the old dark elves, and the new Lumineth Realm-Lords who are based on the old high elves. There are other races, such as the dryad-type creatures known as the Sylvaneth, Orruks (Orcs), and others. There’s also the forces of Chaos, both mortals and demons, who are out there trying to tear the Mortal Realms apart.

It’s a really dynamic setting, and is really well fleshed out and explained in a concise way.

The rules are pretty straightforward. When you’re rolling, it will be to make a test.

A test will have both a difficulty and a complexity. The difficulty is the number you must roll in order to succeed on each die, while the complexity is the number of successes you need to succeed.

If, for example, you are making a Dexterity check, it may be a 4:2 Body (Dexterity) check. This means you’ll need to roll a 4 or better, and need at least 2 successes to succeed. You’ll roll a number of dice equal to your Attribute score, plus your level of Training with the Skill being tested. An easy check may be 2:1, meaning you only need to roll a 2 or better and score at least one success to win. Pretty straightforward. There are also degrees of success. Getting more successes than you were required to will provide larger benefits.

Soulfire and Doom are two other important mechanics. The Soulbound all have souls intertwined with each other. Characters are able to tap into this with their Soulfire. Spending Soulfire allows characters to automatically succedd on checks, reroll dice, recover their Toughness, and even cheat death. Soulfire is increased by completing short-term goals, making a last stand, and other things. Because this is a shared resource, if any other members of your party don’t want you to spend it, you have a choice. You can either agree with them and not spend it, or spend the Soulfire anyway, which will increase your group’s Doom.

Doom tracks the unease in the Mortal Realms. It increases because of the reason above, but also when party members die, when they flee, etc. As Doom grows, enemies will gain extra armor, extra attacks and some extra abilities. It makes everything far more dangerous. It’s a really cool mechanic.

The art throughout the book is absolutely gorgeous. The realms are gorgeously given life, as well as the various beings that fill the land.

The bestiary section is well fleshed out, and the stat-blocks are nicely laid out to make it easy to give you the information you need without needing to flip through the book to find further details. The forces of Chaos, Greenskin Horde, the Skaven, and the new AOS army Ossiarch Bonereapers, are all detailed.

This is a really fantastic book. The mechanics are really interesting and well executed, the setting is impressively explained, and is great for both Age of Sigmar fans and those unfamiliar with the setting.

This review originally appeared at DiceMonkey.net



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Victoriana 2nd Edition Preview
by Ed S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/25/2020 00:48:56

Victoriana 3rd Edition is out, so this review is moot. The quick rules are straightforward enough, but the followup introductory scenario was just plain bad. Bleh.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Victoriana 2nd Edition Preview
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
by Matthäus C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/16/2020 16:32:20

This is one of the best RPG releases of 2011-2020. Easily.

They somehow managed to do with this book, what many RPG publishers simply forgot how to do:

It offers great fluff. I was someone who was antagonistic toward AoS at first, because I felt that GW killed of the flavourful Old World for bland new nothing just to sell Fantasy Space Marines. And while this might have been true a few year ago, I feel that AoS ALREADY has more potential for interesting stories of a much wider range than the Old World ever gave us.

The setting info in this book is not only found in the setting chapter (which features the best overview of the Age of Sigmar timeline/setting that's available anywhere right now, while also giving story hooks and adventure seeds in almost every paragraph), but also inside the introduction and the archetype overview. This is done without ever mixing up fluff and crunch in any way, and it's also never confusing. The book flows from "broad setting overview" to "that's who you will be playing" into "and that's the world they live in".

It gives the players a wide range of options to create characters that are /just/ right, and serve both the "let me just play" and "I want to do everything myself" players. You can start the game by choosing an archetype and begin playing after a few choices, you can chose to customize an archetype and take longer, or you can chose to go fully free-form character creation.

And it offers solid, well designed crunch.

Character skills and talents cover a wide area of expertise that helps build characters that feel different from each other without overwhelming players with lists upon lists of rules exceptions and tiny additives.

The combat system manages to hit both "meaningfully complex and rewarding tactical play" and "crunchy but not overwhelming" states.

There's a Magic system with a wide range of spells that is easy to grasp and use, and also a really great system to create new spells, that is intended be used by PC spell-casters and not just the GM, giving players a hand in further developing their characters and the world they live in.

And then we come to the "endeavor" system (downtime/between adventures actions). This was a great and positive surprise to me. It gives a group of PCs an intrinsic connection to the area they operate from, and allows them to shape its future and strengthen its chances of survival. It's also another system that's easily customizable by the group and the GM.

Coupled with the Doom Pool mechanic, the game uses all those options and capabilities to really tie the characters to the game, taking care to give players a hand in shaping, defending and bleeding for the people who see them as heroes.

The book also offers a really well written and presented GM advice section in which it talks how to change the tone and scope of the game, which was another welcome and surprising addition. All those preferring a more Rat Catcher like tone and feel should sneak a look into here. But those who want to enter into higher levels of play faster will also not be disappointed.

The Bestiary not only gives stat-blocks, but also ideas and suggestions for customizing the adversaries and how to use them in sessions/campaigns.

So, not only is this a really damn great RPG, it's also one that's more than just complete.

While I'm looking forward to sourcebooks deepening the info on some aspects (Lumineth, Seraphon, Vampires and Orruks as the four main ones, but great Skaven content would also be quite excellent.), I could easily run several years worth of campaigns just with this book. There simply isn't the feeling that something's missing.

Both thumbs high, HIGH up for this one. :)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warhammer Age of Sigmar Soulbound Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 61 to 75 (of 767 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates